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Omaha vs. Marquette game recap: 3 things we learned from this upset

Here are three things we learned from Omaha's 97-89 upset of Marquette.

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports

Omaha Transition Points

Omaha started the game off hot with three quick layups. That set the tone for the game. Easy basket came after easy basket. Marquette did not lead until the 17:57 mark in the second half. And when they did, it did not last long. Marquette led for just 47 seconds all game.

After Marquette fought back to tie the game at 66 with 8:39 left in the game, Omaha went on a 15-2 run. At that point, Omaha had scored 27 fast-break points compared to Marquette's 8. Omaha guards C.J. Carter and Devin Patterson pushed the transition offense and combined for 51 points. As an undersized team, Marquette needs to have a better transition defense.

Rebounding

Starting forward Jake White, transfer from Wichita State's Final Four team, missed his second straight game with a foot injury, but Omaha did not miss a beat. Senior forward Mike Rostampour led all rebounders with 11 and helped Omaha out-rebound Marquette 40 to 24. Four starters for Omaha had more than 6 rebounds, including 5-foot-11 guard Devin Patterson. Rebounds, transition buckets and the long ball (41 percent shooting from three) helped lift Omaha past Marquette. December 14 cannot come soon enough for the Golden Eagles as the 6-foot-11 Indiana transfer Luke Fischer becomes eligible then.

Marquette Career Highs

Some positives can still be found in a game where Marquette was manhandled for 40 minutes. Seniors Juan Anderson and Derrick Wilson, along with freshman Duane Wilson all put up career-highs in scoring. Anderson was the only starter who really came to play today, while the other four starters shot just 33 percent from the field. He led Marquette with 23 points (11/15 shooting) and 8 rebounds, 7 of which were offensive. Off the bench, the Wilson duo combined for 32 points and 7 assists.  This is still a young team that is learning a new system. Unfortunately for the Golden Eagles, the young players may disappear in games here and there, but the bench proved it is capable of taking on a larger role if need be.